Champignon cheese and roasted grape tartine

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Right so, before I dive into my mountain of work, I just want to share this little 10-minute recipe with you. Last night, as I was hovering over the theories of pKa and pKb of acid base equilibria, I felt the need to enliven my hardened, stout mouth with something sweet. I always have frozen grapes in the freezer, so I reached for a small bowl of those. I then wondered if I could manipulate these little babies and turn them into a beauteous element in my breakfast the next day, since Saturdays are pretty much the only time I get to experiment in the kitchen, and get together with my best friend Connor, or in real words my Nikon. What to do? Grilled cheese perhaps. I could’ve, you know. But I felt it a bit too stereotypical and I didn’t think we had the right sort of aged cheddar or taleggio around. Then I remembered my dear mother having bought me that enigmatic flat stump of.. what was it? Something with mushrooms. Something with cheese, akin to the texture of brie. Behold, this was born. And please. I had the best bread lying around.

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Champignon Cheese and roasted grape tartine

Ingredients

  • crimson grapes
  • one slice good sourdough or raisin walnut bread
  • champignon cheese spread (may be substituted with ricotta or even melted sharp cheddar. Anything goes really.)
  • coarse sea salt and olive oil
  • balsamic glaze
  • honey or maple syrup
  • 1 tsp chia seeds (opt)

Steps

  1. Preheat oven to 200oC. Roast two handfuls of grapes with sea salt and olive oil for 10 minutes (mine were done and went delicious and bubbly after 7, so just keep an eye on your oven).
  2. Toast bread of choice. Spread on champignon cheese and if you want, season with a pinch of salt.
  3. Take grapes out of oven, spoon on top of cheese. If you are using green grapes, add a layer of beetroot orange relish first, to add some flavour and colour contrast.
  4. Drizzle liberally with honey (I used orange blossom here), chia seeds and balsamic glaze.

You’re welcome.

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